San Diego State University would like to thank the San Diego region, and also communities in cities across the U.S. and abroad, for your faithful and enthusiastic support of the SDSU Mission Valley vision.

SDSU has begun meeting with City of San Diego and both share in the urgent desire to finalize the sale of the land so the university can realize its goal of beginning construction in 2020. The plan provides the opportunity for SDSU to build a world class university research and innovation district, a community river park, housing and a new multi-use stadium.

With the opportunity to purchase the Mission Valley stadium site, SDSU will:

  • Pay Fair Market Value for the land
  • Build a world class university research and innovation campus
  • Build and maintain the river park
  • Build a multiuse stadium for Aztec football and professional soccer
  • Follow the transparent and public California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process
  • Build affordable and market rate housing for students, faculty, staff and the general public

Also, every dollar invested in Mission Valley will return to our public university, our students and the San Diego region through the economic return of higher education. The dividends will come in the form of a better trained workforce and greater economic development. The project will also enable SDSU and its partners to help people expand their livelihoods, finding solutions through research and other growth across all sectors.

Why SDSU

Founded in 1897, San Diego State University has grown from a small teachers' college into a national research university of 36,000 students enrolled in bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs. Today, with nearly 240,000 local alumni and 6,000 employees, SDSU is one of the top economic generators in the San Diego region. According to a recent analysis by ICF, an international consulting firm specializing in economic impact studies, the university generates $5.67 billion in economic activity, and $457 million in state and local tax revenues each year.

Why Mission Valley

To effectively serve increasing demand for higher education and to support regional economic growth, SDSU must identify opportunities for expansion. However, the campus is landlocked within its 288 acres. The Mission Valley site is the only nearby piece of land capable of addressing San Diego State University’s long-term expansion goals.